Center for Sight, Fall River, Massachusetts

September 22, 2019

Alzheimer’s Disease & the Peripheral Retina


Your eyes can tell us a great deal about your overall health. In fact your eyes may turn out to be a “window” to brain degenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Researchers reporting in the Journal of Ophthalmic Research demonstrated that carefully examining and imaging the peripheral retina could identify a greater number of drusen which might be a marker for Alzheimer’s Disease. In addition they found that that while it is normal for blood vessels to get thinner as they approach the peripheral retina, Alzheimer’s patients had a significantly greater rate of thinning as the blood vessels were more peripheral in the retina. While peripheral retinal imaging is not a diagnostic measure for Alzheimer’s Disease, peripheral retina examination and imaging of change in the eye could serve as a tool for disease progression in the brain.

Learn more at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

September 15, 2019

Improvement in Glaucoma Blindness Rate


Rate of Blindness Caused by Glaucoma Decreasing
Glaucoma affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States and over 60 million globally. Although the disease is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, the probability of going blind from glaucoma has been significantly reduced due to advances in diagnosis and treatment. In office use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to study and measure the nerve fiber layer of the retina and optic nerve as well lasers and implantable microscopic devices to change the risk of blindness from glaucoma. Researchers from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine studied the change in the rate of blindness from glaucoma over 2 consecutive 20 year periods and found that the rate of blindness was decreased by half but still remained unacceptably high! The best ways to avoid vision loss from glaucoma are to know your risk factors-such as family history, African and Hispanic descent, smoking, diabetes and sleep apnea, and be sure to schedule regular eye exams with glaucoma testing within timeframes recommended by your eye doctor.

If you or someone you now is concerned about their risk of glaucoma, schedule an eye exam at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

September 8, 2019

Help for Keratoconus with Corneal Cross Linking


Keratoconus is a disease of the cornea in which the normally round dome like shape undergoes thinning and begins to bulge. This results in light entering the eye being irregularly focused and blurring of vision. Early on, the vision changes from keratoconus can be managed with eyeglasses and even later with contact lenses. However, keratoconus is progressive and many sufferers require cornea transplant surgery. The use of a new treatment option called Corneal Cross Linking appears to be successful in the treatment of keratoconus and stabilizes the shape of the cornea either significantly or completely halting the disease progression. 

If you or someone you know suffers from keratoconus and would like to know more about corneal cross linking, schedule an eye exam at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

September 1, 2019

Thinner Retina a Sign of Cognitive Decline


We know that people with dementia typically have a thin retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) when we test them using optical coherence tomography (OCT) during their eye exam. Researcher reporting the results of a large study in JAMA Neurology found a significant association between RNFL thickness and cognitive function even when dementia had not yet been diagnosed. In fact, they found that those people in the bottom 20% of RNFL thickness were twice as likely to suffer cognitive decline over the next three years! This is the first study to identify that a thin RNFL indicates a risk of future cognitive decline and suggests that regular eye tests could help identify those likely to get dementia at a much earlier stage, which means suitable treatments could be prescribed at a more effective time to slow or stop the onset of dementia at early stages of the disease.

If you or someone you know is concerned about their risk of cognitive decline or even dementia, please schedule an eye exam at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

August 25, 2019

Fitness & Exercise Reduces Glaucoma Risk

Did you know that meeting fitness guidelines can actually help reduce your risk of glaucoma? A recent clinical study reported in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) examined if there was an association between physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of glaucoma. Thorough epidemiological data was reviewed and demonstrated that compared with low fitness, those patients with high levels of fitness had a significantly lower risk of glaucoma. By far the lowest risk of glaucoma was found in those patients who had both high fitness levels and met physical activity guidelines recommended by ACSM.

The message is clear-you can lower your risk of glaucoma by being active in accordance with the guidelines and maintaining a high level of fitness. If you or someone you know is concerned about their risk of glaucoma, please schedule an eye exam and glaucoma testing at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island. 

August 18, 2019

Back to School Contact Lens Care


Contact Lens 101: A Back-to-School Must for Teens
Did you know that 25% of children and adolescent emergency room visits related to medical devices are for contact lens problems? Many of our children and teenagers start wearing contact lenses as they enter junior high or high school. Safe and enjoyable contact lens wear does require good hygiene and care in order to prevent a risk of infection. Young people are notoriously poor at caring for their contact lenses, creating a potential gateway for serious eye infections that can cause impaired vision or even blindness. Research has shown that poor contact lens care practices by teens and young people raise their risk of eye conditions such as infectious keratitis and corneal ulcers. In the most severe cases, they may require corneal transplants to restore sight. Fortunately, contact lens eye infections can be prevented by following simple contact lens care guidelines. Here are some practical safety tips that teens with contact lenses should follow to avoid eye infections.

New Quarter, New Case! Replacing your contact lens case every three months will help keep germs at bay. To make it easy to remember, swap out your case at the beginning of each quarter. Waiting to replace contact lens cases after 6 months increases the risk of eye infection by nearly 5.5 times!

Just Say NO to H20. You may be captain of the swim team, but you shouldn’t swim, shower or go in a hot tub wearing lenses. Water from the tap might be clean enough to drink or bathe in, but it’s still home to the parasite Acanthamoeba, which can cause severe eye infections resulting in vision loss. For the same reasons, NEVER use water to rinse or soak contact lenses or cases.

You Snooze, You Lose. Never sleep in your contact lenses. Even occasionally sleeping in contact lenses increases the risk of moderate to severe eye infection by 6.5 times. Unfortunately, a poll of nearly 100,000 people by BuzzFeed found that about 70 percent of respondents occasionally or regularly sleep in their contact lenses.

It’s Too Late If You Wait. Symptoms of eye infections include redness, pain and light sensitivity and requiring examination and evaluation immediately. Waiting to get examined or treated could lead to vision loss.

If you or someone you know would like to learn more or has questions about contact lens hygiene and safety, please schedule an appointment at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

August 11, 2019

Things to Know About Cataracts


Three Things Patients Should Know About Cataracts
Cataracts are an extremely common cause of vision loss-especially as we grow older. In the U.S. some 25 million people have cataracts which can often cause cloudy, blurry vision, dimming of vision, faded or dulling of colors, glare and difficulty with night vision or in dim lighting. These symptoms may indicate the presence of cataracts, which affect about 70 percent of people by age 75. The good news for people with cataracts is that they are corrected with cataract surgery and lens implants and restore excellent vision and a better lifestyle. Things you should know about cataracts include:

Age Isn’t the Only Risk Factor for Cataracts. Pretty much everyone will develop cataracts with age, many studies demonstrate that lifestyle and behavior can influence when and how severely you develop cataracts. Diabetes, extensive exposure to sunlight, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure and certain ethnicities have all been linked to increased risk of cataracts. Eye injuries, prior eye surgery and long-term use of steroid medication can also result in cataracts.

Cataracts Cannot Be Prevented, But You Can Lower Your Risk. Always wear UV blocking sunglasses and hats with brims when out in sunlight. Eating more Vitamin C-rich foods may delay how fast cataracts form. Absolutely, avoid smoking cigarettes, which have been shown to increase the risk of cataract development.

Cataract Surgery Helps Improve More Than Your Vision. During cataract surgery, we replace the natural clouded lens with a permanent artificial lens implant or called an intraocular lens, or IOL, which should improve your vision significantly and allow us to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism that you may have had before your procedure. In addition, we can help you choose a lens implant that also provides you a range of clear vision for arm’s length and near tasks such as for reading or using the computer. Besides the vision benefits, cataract surgery has been shown to improve your overall quality of life and reduce the risk of falling by providing more comfortable and safer mobility. 

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please schedule an appointment at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.