Center for Sight, Fall River, Massachusetts

September 3, 2018

Energy Drinks, Eye Problems & Vision Loss


Energy drinks that contain very large quantities of stimulants such as caffeine, sugar and others are often consumed by both adults and even teenagers looking for that extra energy boost. There have been concerns about and reports of headaches, blood pressure spikes, neurological and heart problems with the consumption of these drinks. Now we have seen that energy drinks may also cause retinal hemorrhages and vision loss and want to caution patients who consume them to be aware of the potential risks. A recent report cites the case of a 48 year old gentleman who had high blood pressure and consumed several cans of energy drinks. A short time later he presented in the emergency room with very high blood pressure, a very fast heart rate and a sudden loss of vision. He was examined and found to have hemorrhages within his retina that lead to his sudden vision loss. It is clear that for some people consuming energy drinks might be acceptable and even useful but for others the risks may not be worthwhile.

If you or someone you know drinks energy drinks and experiences any eye problems or vision loss please call Center for Sight – 508-730-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

August 19, 2018

Vision Problems in Preschool Children


Vision problems and visual impairment in preschool children can lead to learning and development problems that impacts long term academic and even social success. Researchers reporting in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology studied the prevalence, demographic and geographic variations of visual impairment in kids and projected what might lie ahead.

In 2015, more than 174 000 children aged 3 to 5 years in the United States were visually impaired. Almost 121 000 of these cases (69%) arose from simple uncorrected refractive error, and 43 000 (25%) from bilateral amblyopia. The number of preschool children with visual impairment is projected to increase by 26% in 2060. Hispanic white children will account for the largest number and proportion of cases, followed by African American children.

This study suggests that the number of preschool children with visual impairment is projected to increase disproportionally, especially among minority populations. Vision screening for refractive error and related eye diseases may prevent a high proportion of preschool children from experiencing unnecessary visual impairment and associated developmental delays.

August 13, 2018

Things You Should Know About Cataracts


Cataracts seem to be a more common eye health and vision problem that we hear about today. In part this is because as patients age you are no longer willing to accept the limitations that decreased vision from cataracts can impose on your day to day activities. This, combined with ability to restore vision loss from cataracts in a safe, effective and predictable manner with cataract surgery and lens implants for vision correction motivates more patients, at early ages, to seek solutions to help us maintain an active, engaged and productive lifestyle.

About Cataracts
Approximately 25 million Americans have cataracts, which cause cloudy, blurry or dim vision and often develop with advancing age. As everyone grows older, the lenses of their eyes thicken and become cloudier. Eventually, they may find it more difficult to read street signs. Colors may seem dull. These symptoms may signal cataracts, which affect about 70 percent of people by age 75. Fortunately, cataracts can be corrected with surgery. Ophthalmologists who are cataract surgeons perform around three million cataract surgeries each year to restore vision to those patients. Here are some facts people should know about cataracts.
  • Age isn’t the only risk factor for cataracts. Though most everyone will develop cataracts with age, recent studies show that lifestyle and behavior can influence when and how severely you develop cataracts. Diabetes, extensive exposure to sunlight, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure and certain ethnicities have all been linked to increased risk of cataracts. Eye injuries, prior eye surgery and long-term use of steroid medication, perhaps for asthma, allergies or breathing problems or arthritis- can also result in cataracts. If you have any of these and are experiencing blurry or cloudy vision, difficulty with night vision especially glare or haloes, you should schedule an eye exam and alert your eye doctor.
  • Cataracts cannot be prevented, but you can lower your risk. Wearing UV-blocking sunglasses and brimmed hats when outside can help. Several studies suggest that eating more vitamin C-rich foods may delay how fast cataracts form. Also, avoid smoking cigarettes, which have been shown to increase the risk of cataract development.
  • Surgery may help improve more than just your vision. During the procedure, the natural clouded lens is replaced with an artificial lens called an intraocular lens, or IOL, which should improve your vision significantly. Patients have a variety of lenses to choose from, each with different benefits. Lens implants today can correct a full range of vision and help you see clearly at far, arm’s length and near-without being dependent on eyeglasses! While this is great for many patients, studies have shown that cataract surgery can improve quality of life and reduce the risk of falling which is a potentially serious risk and problem for seniors. If you think a cataract is possibly interfering with your ability to see well you should schedule an eye exam and alert your eye doctor.
If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Center for Sight- 508-730-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

August 6, 2018

LASIK & Soft Contact Lens Vision


Vision with Laser Vision Correction after Wearing Soft Contacts
If you wear soft contact lenses, you already know the benefit of not having to wear eyeglasses for seeing clearly at distance. But, you may wonder how well LASIK will correct your vision. If you rely on your contact lenses, you may  also wonder how  long you may have to go without wearing them before you can have LASIK, and will that change your results.  A recent Study reported in the journal of the British Contact Lens Association, Contact Lenses & Anterior Eye compared the vision results of soft contact lens wearers with both LASIK and PRK among groups of people who had stopped wearing their soft contacts for 2 weeks before their laser vision correction, others 24 hours before laser vision correction and those who didn’t wear contact lenses at all prior to laser vision correction.

Results of Laser Vision Correction Compared to Soft Contact Lenses
The patients who had stopped wearing their contacts 2 weeks before having laser eye surgery to correct nearsightedness, vision without glasses was significantly better at one month, and at six months after having laser vision correction was even better than those who had never worn contacts, but only glasses!

If you are a soft contact lens wearer thinking about LASIK or PRK please schedule a free consultation at Center for Sight -508-730-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406,  Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

July 30, 2018

Kid’s Back to School Eye Exams


Time for Kid’s Back to School Eye Exams
With back-to-school time around the corner, parents will be scrambling to buy new school supplies and clothes. As they tick off their long list of school to-dos, we are reminding moms and dads not to neglect one of the most important learning tools: their children’s eyes. Good vision and overall eye health are vital to learning. Because children are still growing, being vigilant about eye health is important.

Tips for Kids’ Healthy Eyes & Vision
Get Regular Childhood Vision Screenings - Children’s eyes change rapidly, making regular vision screenings an important step in detecting and correcting eye problems earlyIn addition to screenings for infants, the American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends further vision screening for children when they are:

>Pre-School age, between age 3 and 3 and a half
>Entering School
>Experiencing a Possible Vision Problem 

Know and Share Your Family Eye Health History - Everyone should find out whether eye conditions or diseases run in their family. Parents should share that information with the person performing the screening or eye exam when possible. Examples of common eye conditions include nearsightedness, crossed eye, known as strabismus, and lazy eye, known as amblyopia. If these are not treated in childhood, they can cause permanent vision loss in one eye.   

Watch for Signals of Eye Problems - Parents should be alert to symptoms that could indicate an eye or vision problem, such as complaints of eyestrain, headaches and squinting when reading or performing other common activities. Other symptoms to look for include a white or grayish-white coloring in the pupil, one eye that turns in or out, or eyes that do not track in sync together.

Wear Protective Eyewear When Playing Sports - Eye injuries while playing sports can cause serious damage, whether by getting smacked with an elbow during basketball or hit with a hockey stick. If your child plays racket sports, hockey, field hockey, baseball or basketball, consider having them wear goggles or other certified protective eyewear. 

If you or someone you know has a child that needs to schedule an eye exam please call The Center for Sight-508-730-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

July 22, 2018

Stroke Warning: Retinal Artery Blockage!

Retinal Artery Blockage May Warn of Impending Stroke
A certain retinal vessel disease may be a warning of an impending stroke! When an artery or vein in the retina becomes blocked or “occluded” it can be a sign of more serious health issues that need to be looked at-quickly! A central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is a disease of the eye where the flow of blood through the central retinal artery is blocked. Patients suffering from a central artery occlusion experience a sudden, severe, painless loss of vision in one eye. While there can be several different causes of the blockage, most often a central retinal artery occlusion is caused by unhealthy carotid arteries which supply the head and neck with oxygen. Unhealthy carotid arteries are those that have atherosclerosis, are narrowed and filled with a waxy fatty substance that forms plaques that can break off and end up in the retinal circulation. Retinal artery occlusion is a significant warning of a stroke risk and indeed more than 15% of the patients having a central retinal artery occlusion experience a stroke within 4 years after the artery blockage.

A retinal artery occlusion is a medical emergency as the loss of vision is fast and irreversible.  If you or someone you know experiences a quick painless severe loss of vision in one eye, please call us immediately and relay your symptoms to the person taking your phone and request an immediate appointment. Please call Center for Sight -508-730-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

July 7, 2018

Glaucoma: Pregnancy, Labor & Eye Pressure


Pregnancy, Labor & Eye Pressure: What You Need to Know!
What could pregnancy, labor and your eye pressure have to do with one another?  For the clear majority of “new moms to be” the thought of their upcoming labor can cause them to voice concerns about their physical as well as emotional wellbeing. Typically, your obstetrician will be a sound source of information about what to expect in terms of pain, discomfort and how they will help you manage the physical discomfort and stress of labor. From time to time we have a patient who is pregnant and who has a family history of glaucoma or is perhaps “ocular hypertensive,” meaning that they have had a high intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement as part of their annual routine eye exam who shares their concern about the physical stress of labor and if there is any chance of eye and optic nerve damage during delivery. Fortunately, recent data from a study we reviewed in the Journal of Glaucoma showed us that eye pressure and blood flow into the optic nerve during the various stages of vaginal labor are not changed and there is no increased risk to those who have a family history of glaucoma or high eye pressure. Mom’s to be can put this fear to rest!

If you are pregnant and have a family history of glaucoma or have been told that you at risk for glaucoma due to a high eye pressure, please be reassured that labor and delivery will not expose you to greater risk. It is important however to continue your regular eye exams-even during pregnancy-and especially if you experience any changes in your vision or general eye health! Please call Center for Sight – 508-730-2020, Fall River - to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is located in the Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, MA, and is conveniently located for patients throughout the South Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.