Center for Sight, Fall River, Massachusetts

June 29, 2020

Top 5 AMD Risk Factors


Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss among Americans ages 65 and over. To help reduce your chance of vision loss from AMD:


  • know the risk factors for AMD, 
  • know your family eye & medical history, and 
  • schedule and keep regular eye exam appointments.


The Top 5 Risk Factors for AMD include:
  • Being over the Age of 60
  • Having a Family History of AMD
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension
People with any two of these risk factors should schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist and,

People who are at risk should know the symptoms of Wet AMD, the form most likely to cause rapid and serious vision loss including: 


  • sudden, noticeable loss of vision, or
  • sudden distortion of vision, such as seeing "wavy" lines.

See an ophthalmologist right away if these symptoms occur. Treatments for wet AMD provide an excellent chance of stopping vision loss. They may actually restore some vision when macular degeneration develops. Earlier diagnosis of wet AMD gives a better chance of successful treatment. You can control some AMD risk factors, such as smoking and diet, to reduce the risk of vision loss. One way to reduce AMD risk is to quit smoking or never start. You can't control all your risks, however. For example, you can't do anything about your genetics. Knowing family medical history and sharing it with your ophthalmologist is an important step to protect your vision. For patients at high risk for developing late-stage wet AMD, taking a specific, AMD dietary supplement lowers that risk by 25 percent. However, patients should check with their ophthalmologist before starting any dietary supplement!

June 22, 2020

The FDA Warns About Smoking, Eye Health & Vision Problems




We have strongly recommended that patients stop smoking and even avoid second hand smoke as we have reviewed the studies demonstrating the increased risk of Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), Cataracts, Diabetic Retinopathy, Dry Eye and even Optic Nerve Damage among those who smoked. This is in addition to full range of cardiovascular problems. Now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration  has recently proposed new warning labels for cigarettes and cigarette advertising in which two of the FDA's 13 new proposed cigarette warning labels feature effects of smoking that are linked to eyes and vision. These two new warnings focus on the leading causes of blindness in the United States-Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Cataracts! Our message to patients remains strong-If you are a smoker-STOP! If you are not a smoker-DON”T START!
If you or someone you know has been a smoker or is around smokers it would be important to schedule an eye exam at Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

June 9, 2020

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes


Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes
#1 Pink eye only happens in young children. While young kids are known for getting pink eye, due to close contact in day care centers, so can teenagers, college students, and adults-especially those who don’t clean their contacts. The best way to keep pink eye from spreading is to practice good hygiene, including washing your hands, not touching your eyes, and using clean towels and other products around the face.
#2 Antibiotics are necessary to cure your child’s pink eye. Antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat pink eye. There are three types of pink eye: Viral, Bacterial & Allergic Conjunctivitis. Most cases are caused by viral infections or allergies and do not respond to antibiotics. Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis depending on severity. Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis usually resolve on their own within 7 to 14 days without treatment.
#3 Sun is bad for your eyes. While it’s true that long-term exposure to the sun without proper protection can increase the risk of eye disease, some studies suggest sun exposure is necessary for normal visual development. Children who have less sun exposure seem to be at higher risk for developing myopia or nearsightedness. Just make sure they’re protected with UV-blocking sunglasses and sunscreen.
#4 Blue light from screens is damaging children’s vision. Contrary to what you may be reading on the internet, blue light is not blinding you or your screen-obsessed kids. While it is true that nearsightedness is becoming more common, blue light isn’t the culprit. In fact, we are exposed to much more blue light naturally from the sun than we are from our screens. The important thing to remember is to take frequent breaks. Use the 20-20-20 rule: look at an object at least 20 feet away every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.
#5 Vision loss only happens to adults. The eyes of a child with amblyopia (lazy eye) may look normal, but this eye condition can steal sight if not treated. Amblyopia is when vision in one of the child’s eyes is reduced because the eye and brain are not working together properly. Strabismus (crossed eyes) is another eye condition that can cause vision loss in a child. Strabismus is when the eyes do not line up in the same direction when focusing on an object.
#6 All farsighted children need glasses. Most children are farsighted early in life. It’s actually normal. It doesn’t necessarily mean your child needs glasses because they use their focusing muscles to provide clear vision for both distance and near vision. Children do need glasses when their farsightedness blurs their vision or leads to strabismus. They will also need glasses if they are significantly more farsighted in one eye compared with the other, a condition that puts them at risk of developing amblyopia.
#7 There is no difference between a vision screening and a vision exam. While it’s true that your child’s eyes should be checked regularly, a less invasive vision screening by a pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist, optometrist, orthoptist, or person trained in vision assessment of preschool children is adequate for most children. If the screening detects a problem, the child may need to see an ophthalmologist or other eye care professional. A comprehensive exam involves the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil, enabling a more thorough investigation of the overall health of the eye and visual system.

June 4, 2020

Cataract Risk, Diet & Health



Combination of Healthy Diet & Healthy Body Weight Lowers Cataract Risk
The Blue Mountains Eye Study showed that carefully following dietary guidelines decreased risk of visual impairment. However, whether or not this association extends to age-related cataract was not clear. So, researchers have now reported on a study to determine if strict adherence to dietary guidelines, using total diet score, impacted the incidence of age-related cataract. Using complex statistical analysis of the Blue Mountains Eye Study, the found that adhering to dietary guidelines and total diet score by itself was not associated with incidence of any cataract, BUT as total diet score increases with a Body Mass Index (BMI)<25, there is an association with lower risk of nuclear cataract which is a known aging marker.

If you or someone you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

May 22, 2020

Masks: Why Are We All Wearing One?



We know that the primary way people get infected with COVID-19 is through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets are released into the air when you sneeze, cough AND talk! The research tells us that face masks-even common cloth masks, surgical masks and non-fit-tested respirators, can be an effective barrier to spreading respiratory droplets. So…we are…and we ask you to…wear a mask please!

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision!
Should you need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 508-730-2020 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation  or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Center for Sight.

Visit us at Center for Sight or on Facebook.

May 13, 2020

Practical Eye Health Tips for COVID



There are some practical eye health tips and precautions that you should consider to stay safe from COVID risk. We suggest thinking about:
  • If You Wear Contact Lenses, Consider Switching to Glasses for a While. There's no evidence that wearing contact lenses increases your risk of Coronavirus infection, but if you wear contacts, you tend to touch your eyes more than average. Wearing glasses decreases the likelihood and need to touch your eyes.
  • Wearing Glasses May Add a Layer of Protection. Eyeglasses or sunglasses can shield your eyes from infected respiratory droplets in the air, but they don’t provide 100% security. The virus can still reach your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms of your glasses. If you’re caring for a sick patient or potentially exposed person, safety goggles may offer a stronger defense. 
  • Stock Up on Eye Drops and Medicine Prescriptions If You Can. If possible try to stock up on critical medications and eye drops, so that you’ll have enough to get by if you are quarantined or if your pharmacy is unable to fill your refills. If your insurance allows you to get more than 1 month of essential eye medicine, such as glaucoma drops, you should do so. Some insurers will approve a 3-month supply of medication in times of natural disaster. Ask your pharmacist or our office for help if you have trouble getting approval from your insurance company. And as always, request a refill as soon as you’re due. Don’t wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 
  • Avoid Rubbing Your Eyes. Everyone rubs their eyes! We all do it and it can be a tough to stop. But-doing so will lower your risk of infection. If you feel an urge to itch or rub your eye or even to adjust your glasses, use a tissue instead of your fingers. Dry eyes can lead to more rubbing, so consider adding moisturizing drops to your eye routine. If you must touch your eyes for any reason-even to administer eye medicine-wash your hands first with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Then wash them again afterwards.
We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 508-730-2020 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Center for Sight. Visit us at Center for Sight or Facebook.com/CenterForSightFallRiver/.

May 4, 2020

COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses-What to Know!


COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses
The traditional “best practices” for wearing contact lenses safely may not be sufficient to completely prevent COVID-19 spread, as wearing contact lenses requires a great deal of finger manipulation around the eyelids, nose and mouth in order to insert the lenses. Contact lens wearers often touch their eyes, mouth and nose, putting wearers at risk for contracting the virus. Even with the best care and hygiene the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recently published recommendations for corona virus eye safety that strongly suggested not wearing contact lenses and keeping everything away from patients’ eyes. That said, you can choose to keep wearing your contact lenses but:
  1. Wash your hands carefully and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, followed by hand drying with unused paper towels. This should occur before every contact lens insertion and removal. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. People should avoid touching their face, including their eyes, nose and mouth, with unwashed hands.
  2. Disinfect or dispose your contact lenses as prescribed by your doctor. Either dispose of your daily disposable lenses each evening, or regularly disinfect your monthly and two-week lenses according to instructions.
  3. Discontinue lens wear if sick. Consistent with recommendations for other types of illness, those who feel ill with cold or flu-like symptoms should cease contact lens wear.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 508-730-2020 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Center for Sight. Visit us at Center for Sight at our Eye Care Blog, or on Facebook.