Center for Sight, Fall River, Massachusetts

May 22, 2018

Glaucoma: Pregnancy, Labor & Eye Pressure


Pregnancy, Labor & Eye Pressure: What You Need to Know!
What could pregnancy, labor and your eye pressure have to do with one another?  For the clear majority of “new moms to be” the thought of their upcoming labor can cause them to voice concerns about their physical as well as emotional wellbeing. Typically, your obstetrician will be a sound source of information about what to expect in terms of pain, discomfort and how they will help you manage the physical discomfort and stress of labor. From time to time we have a patient who is pregnant and who has a family history of glaucoma or is perhaps “ocular hypertensive,” meaning that they have had a high intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement as part of their annual routine eye exam who shares their concern about the physical stress of labor and if there is any chance of eye and optic nerve damage during delivery. Fortunately, recent data from a study we reviewed in the Journal of Glaucoma showed us that eye pressure and blood flow into the optic nerve during the various stages of vaginal labor are not changed and there is no increased risk to those who have a family history of glaucoma or high eye pressure. Mom’s to be can put this fear to rest!

If you are pregnant and have a family history of glaucoma or have been told that you at risk for glaucoma due to a high eye pressure, please be reassured that labor and delivery will not expose you to greater risk. It is important however to continue your regular eye exams-even during pregnancy-and especially if you experience any changes in your vision or general eye health! Please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

May 13, 2018

BOTOX® for Crossed Eyes?


Almost everyone knows that BOTOX® is a pretty popular treatment to smooth fine lines and wrinkles and help restore a youthful appearance. BOTOX® can also be helpful for migraine headaches, facial spasms, excessive sweating and a host of other problems. We also know that BOTOX® can also be helpful for treatment of crossed eyes! According to articles from the American Academy of Ophthalmology, recent studies as well as other expert reports, BOTOX® injections can indeed be a possible treatment option for certain patients with crossed eyes.

If you or a child you know has crossed eyes and wishes to learn more about treatment options, please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

May 7, 2018

AMD & Low Glycemic Diet


Does a Low Glycemic Diet Help AMD?
Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University also believe that the study, published in the journal PNAS, points to potential biomarkers of AMD. These can be used to predict when a person is at risk for this disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in adults over the age of 50. Using a mouse research model, the researchers observed that a high–glycemic diet resulted in the development of many AMD features, including loss of function of cells at the back of the eye called retinal pigmented epithelial atrophy (RPE) and of the cells that capture light, called photoreceptors-both of which are precursors to Dry AMD, whereas a low–glycemic diet did not. Importantly, switching from a high–glycemic diet to a low–glycemic diet arrested damage to the retina. The authors of the study suggested that these experimental results may indicate that switching from a high–glycemic diet to a low–glycemic one is beneficial to eye health in people that are heading towards developing AMD.

If you or a someone you know would like to learn more about diet and AMD please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

April 22, 2018

Cataract Surgery Astigmatism Lens Implants


Satisfaction with Cataract Surgery Astigmatism Lens Implants
Good news for patients with astigmatism who are having cataract surgery! When your cataract is removed and replaced with a lens implant to correct your vision, patients who have astigmatism will be pleased to know that satisfaction with cataract lens implants for astigmatism is extremely high. A recent study presented in the American Journal of Ophthalmology compared using toric astigmatism correcting lens implants to a manual incisional procedure for correcting astigmatism, called corneal relaxing incisions. Although both methods of astigmatism correction resulted in good vision for the cataract patients, the astigmatism correcting toric lens implants gave patients a better overall satisfaction with their vision as reported in quality of life questionnaire 12 months after their cataract surgery with cataract lens implants that corrected the astigmatism. Patients were particularly pleased to be able to wear non- prescription sunglasses and be independent of eyeglasses for seeing clearly at distance.

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

April 8, 2018

Exercise Effect on Eye Health & Physiology




Physical exercise has been known to be one of the most important factors in preventing cardiovascular disorders and may even help prevent some neurodegenerative diseases. A recent review of clinical studies compared the results of various reports regarding the effects of physical exercises on intraocular pressure (IOP), myopia (nearsightedness) and eye circulation and blood flow.

Eye Pressure or Intraocular Pressure (IOP)
Exercises that involve movement, called dynamic exercises, are known to reduce IOP for a brief period after participating. However, certain isometric exercises such a Yoga in “downward” positions may increase IOP.
Myopia or Nearsightedness
There is a solid connection between the time being spent outdoor and reduction in the odds of developing myopia-in fact 2% less odds for every hour spent outdoors!
Eye Circulation
Physical exercises increase retinal blood flow up to 140%, thus providing more blood to retina and stimulating better circulation.

The message is clear-staying fit and active throughout life can be of great long-term benefit to your eyes!

April 1, 2018

Choices for Your Eye Health & Vision


Making Good Choices for Your Eye Health & Vision
A little bit of knowledge can go a long way in helping you make good choices for preserving your eye health and vision throughout your life.  Did you know that some 37 million adults in the United States alone have age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, or glaucoma-all of which can cause visual impairment or blindness! We know-and want to share the information with you-from recent studies that tell us that making healthy choices and getting regular eye exams can help reduce a person’s risk of vision loss.

About Healthy Choices for Preventing Vision Loss & Eye Problems
Live a healthy lifestyle. Eating a nutritious diet, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking can lower your risk of eye disease. Foods that boost eye health include dark green leafy greens, cold water fish and citrus fruits. A diet rich in vitamin C can cut the risk of cataract progression by nearly almost 30%. We know for certain that smoking doubles the risk of the eye disease age-related macular degeneration, is linked to cataracts, and worsens dry eye. If you smoke-STOP! If you don’t smoke, DON’T START!

Know your family history. Certain eye diseases can be inherited or may have a strong predisposition among family members. If you have a close relative with macular degeneration, you have a 50 percent chance of developing the condition. In addition, a family history of glaucoma increases your chances of developing the condition by four to nine times. So talk to your family members about what eye conditions they have. It can help you and your eye doctor evaluate whether you may be at higher risk.

Get a dilated eye exam. Many eye diseases may have no symptoms in their early stages. A dilated eye exam is the best way to detect eye diseases so they can be treated as soon as possible to help prevent vision loss. All adults should have a baseline comprehensive dilated eye exam by the time they turn 40. This is when age-related eye changes often begin to occur. People who are 65 and older should get an eye exam every one to two years. Those with chronic conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure or known eye diseases may need to go earlier and more often at the recommendation of their eye doctor.

Wear sunglasses. Over time, exposure to UV rays from the sun can increase your risk of cataracts, certain cancers and growths in or around the eyes. When choosing sunglasses, pick ones that block out at least 99 percent of UV rays. A wide-brimmed hat offers great additional protection as well.

Use protective eyewear to prevent injuries. Roughly a third of all emergency room visits for eye-related issues stem from traumatic eye injuries, according to a recent study in the journal Ophthalmology. To help prevent these injuries, wear the right protective eyewear when doing activities that could cause eye injuries, such as home repair, garden work and sports.

If you or someone you know needs to schedule an eye exam please call Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.

March 5, 2018

Sports Eye Injuries: Which Sports Are Most Likely?



Sports eye injuries are most likely to occur in kids playing basketball, baseball and participating in cycling according to a study published in JAMA Ophthalmology. Of the 30,000 annual emergency room visits for sports related eye injuries the majority happens to kids under the age of 18. Basketball and cycling were the two sports most likely to cause eye injuries, while 21 percent of baseball and softball injuries resulted in actual fractures of the bones around the eye, which often require surgery to repair. Research has shown that wearing sports appropriate protective eyewear can significantly reduce the incidence of sports-related eye injuries. We have witnessed that when appropriate eyewear is available-even if not mandatory-top-performing athletes frequently choose to wear it. Wear protective eyewear! The message is clear for sports participants, parents and sports program organizers.

If you or someone you know plays sports recreationally or competitively, take the time to select proper sports protective eyewear to avoid the risk of sports eye injury. Please call
Center for Sight 508-730-2020, visit Center for Sight, Google+ or www.facebook.com/centerforsightfallriver  to schedule an appointment.

Center for Sight is conveniently located in Narragansett Mill at 1565 North Main Street, Suite 406, Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 for patients from Massachusetts or Rhode Island.